Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS) are vital to the future sustainability of the transport sector. With a focus on increasing road safety and tackling Europe’s growing emission and congestion problems, they can make transport safer, more efficient, and more sustainable by applying various information and communication technologies to all modes of passenger and freight transport. Moreover, the integration of existing technologies can create new services. ITS are key to support jobs and growth in the transport sector of the future.

Transport companies across Europe have been widely anticipating the outcome and decision on the new regulatory package that will fundamentally change the rules of the transport market.

When taking the ferry a whole host of questions and doubts can pop into your head. In this latest Overdrive post, we attempt to answer some of the most Frequently Asked Questions that our Services Department encounter on a day to day basis. Hopefully these will help you plan for a more relaxing trip.

In recent years there have been significant developments in the world of tolls and traffic charges on a Pan-European level.

As part of our series of articles relating to Digital Transformation, Vrio has carried out a survey of over 200 UK & Irish National & International Transport Companies about the issue of “Connected Vehicles”. Overall, the results of the survey show that the majority of respondents had previously heard of connected-vehicles technology; however, most had a neutral or negative initial opinion of the technology.

As an industry, goods have been passing from one establishment to another based on a physical signature for centuries, in fact, the first proof of delivery has been traced back as far as 1685. Despite the digital revolution and the technology that we currently have at our disposal, not a lot has changed since then in terms of how goods are transferred through the supply chain, with many companies still using paper and ink to validate the delivery and reception of goods.

The road is often overlooked when discussing the future development and digital transformation of the modern transport infrastructure. Afterall, we have all heard of connected cars, self-driving cars, gps navigation, route optimization apps and ride-hailing services. You would be forgiven for thinking how the common road fits into this digital revolution, as it turns out, the road itself can be a platform for an amazing array of innovations.

When movement restrictions were first announced across Europe due to the coronavirus outbreak, e-commerce was singled out as the big winner. Although it might have seemed an obvious prediction at the time, the situation surrounding the outbreak also raised concerns among some experts that the whole e-commerce structure could collapse due to the unprecedented demand with consumers being left no choice but to shop online.

European environmental programmes encourage or impose measures that reduce air pollution. Air quality standards have been established which compel national governments and urban areas to implement measures to reduce pollutants emitted by traffic.

In the face of the current Coronavirus pandemic that has shocked the world over recent months and weeks, governments at local, regional and national level are being forced to make some unprecedented decisions to protect the health an well-being of society, whilst simultaneously trying to avert a local/global economic meltdown.